Tag: South Africa

#1 – Small Pleasures

I struggled with this topic. The first thing that popped into my mind was coffee – that morning brew that kicks my morning into gear. But how do you take an interesting picture of something ordinary? Herein lies the challenge of a seemingly mundane topic. For me it is all about finding that unique perspective / composition that tells an interesting story – but at the end of this challenge I kind of slipped into the mundane and did not really convey a interesting or unique picture.

There were quite a few ideas that sprang to mind, but what really stood out to me were i) hobbies ii) spending time with people. Another spin on the topic could have been: what are the universal small pleasures that cuts across cultures and borders? A father holding his daughter’s hand. A child blowing bubbles and the way parents delight in the company of their children. The time I spent with my dad taking photos in Braam or in our neighbourhood.

I ended up going with my guitar (but I am not 100% happy with the picture, because I don’t feel that it really tells a proper and unique story). Maybe for the next topic I will spend more time brainstorming before posting.

_MG_0558

 

 

Advertisements

Bright Light

Fall into His grace.

Even though we are in the Light, it might feel as though the shadows are closing in on us, threatening to envelop and extinguish us. “Why are ye fearful, O ye of little faith?”

Fall into His grace.

 

Bright Light

It is in the sharp bright light,

When a shadow falls, it frights

As it obscures my vision

That was once crystal clear

Even a slight dim causes plight

Makes me question sight

 

I yearn to draw near to the Father

Even when a shadow falls, it frights

I yearn to fix my eyes on the Constant

The Father never wavers

When the shadow falls on my face

The Father responds with grace

 

My knees are scraped and tender

But I could kneel more

My knuckles are white and tired

But I could pray more

My jaw is tight and numb

But I could praise more

 

It is in the sharp bright light,

When a shadow falls, it frights

I want to hold on to the light

For this is where there is life

Where idols crumble

And the Cross humbles

 

May 2016 – Francois Hermanus Steyn

Bokeh! | Haze | Blur

What do you with a 50mm lens?

One suggestion is to try out what the photographic geeks call “bokeh”. It’s a Japanese word meaning “haze” or “blur” (thanks Wikipedia). A part of the picture is in focus (subject or foreground) and the rest of the picture is out of focus (usually background). Examples below:

What do Afrikaners do with a 50mm lens? Braai-bokeh!

DSC_4780.jpg

What do you do with a 50mm lens at a kiddies party? Bubbles-bokeh!

DSC_4814.jpg

Time lapse #1

I’ve been fooling around with proper time lapses lately – where one takes a series of photographs and then proceeds to “stitch” them together using software (I’ve used Cyberlink’s PowerDirector… cringe.. I’m living the minimalist life).

DSLR cameras have the ability to capture videos (1080p and also 4k) which you can merely speed up using your software to create a time lapse video, but shooting these 1080p videos at 30fps or 60fps can easily chow up all the storage in your SD card.

To create that time lapse it is simple enough to just take photographs using a remote shutter (like R500), magic lantern (Canon hacks) or built-in time lapse settings that a lot of the newer DSLR cameras have. I was forced to use a shutter since my camera is old by today’s standards (living the minimalist life). The Nikon D3100 can also only manage 1080p video at 24fps, but do you really think it will have a intervalometer built in? No, it doesn’t.

Furthermore, having software that can adjust the levels and balance of all your photographs in one go (i.e. in one BATCH) before you stitch them together will help you save time and will really polish your time lapse (I did not have this available, so I just stitched the normal #nofilter photos together).

Make sure to set the camera on manual focus once you are happy with your focus point and then just time your lapses and snap every 10 or 5 seconds, depending on the effect that you desire. Oh yah – remember a tripod.

Here is to the start of many time lapses!